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The World is Your Oyster, Artist - Kim Simon, Materials 7000 oyster shells and steel armature

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Turning Trash to Treasure Exhibition

Our Turning Trash to Treasure exhibition has asked local artists to find the treasure in the trash and create something beautiful from what would otherwise end up as Market waste.

The final pieces will be on display for two weeks during Sustainable September. The idea came from local artist Kim Simon who used more than 7,000 oyster shells from Aptus Seafood and steel armature to create the beautiful sculpture (pictured) titled The World is Your Oyster.

Where: SO:ME Space, South Melbourne Market
When: Market days (Wed, Fri, Sat & Sun), Wed 20 September – Sun 1 October 2017
Cost: Free, just take a wander through and enjoy!

Most of the works on display will be for sale, prices TBC once works have been completed.


Exhibiting Artist Information

Artist:
Michael Hanley
Industrial Lighting Designer, upcycled scultpure, small business owner of upswitch.

Proposed name of piece:
Cupsphere

Vision:
It’s apparent that we now live in a world where a quick hit of coffee is all that’s needed to stay on the move. But what happens to all the cups we dispose of? I was shocked to hear on ABC’s ‘War on Waste’ that coffee cups can’t actually be recycled, and since then I’ve noticed them appearing on every street corner, often flung into the gutter from a car window or next to the tram stop. Unfortunately most people aren’t aware of their impact on waste, so I’d like to create something that allows people to consider the life of a coffee cup after it’s single use. My idea is to create a miniature world/sphere from these discarded coffee cups, which glows from the inside so that all the cups light up. At the core of the structure will be a luminescent sphere, made from some sort of plastic spherical object – to be sourced from recycled materials if possible. Fixed to all surfaces of the sphere will be the disposed cups, attached at the base end so that each cup will glow from its inside. Most coffee cups have white paper on the inside, which will illuminate on all surfaces. Some cups will have coffee stains which should create contrasting shades, whilst highlighting their original use. I hope to make it big enough to contain 50-100 cups in order to maximise the visual impact and show people just how many cups are thrown to waste. It is hoped that viewers will consider what a world covered in coffee cups will look like.”

Materials:
Disposed coffee cups, clear spherical object (to be determined), lighting components (LED globe, lampholder, cable), wire or hanging cable.


Artist:
JW Lowe Artist
Currently studying MA Art in Public Space at RMIT.

Proposed name of piece:
Fragile Score

Vision:
A sculptural ‘graphic score’ suspended from the ceiling. Crushed glass wrapped in copper wire will sparkle like small jewels along vertical wires. A graphic score is essentially sheet music that employs gestural notation in place of conventional music notes. The crushed glass represents sustainability, fragility and beauty, as well as communicating a certain amount of peril.

Materials:
Crushed glass from the Market, copper wire possibly brass wire based on aesthetics, a thicker wire, rod/frame, spotlights.


Artist:
Mat Vaughan
BA (Hons) Fine Art from Uni Melb and practising Melbourne-based visual artist.
I have previously run a collaborative printmaking art project using parts from a VW kombi, as part of the 2016 Big Draw Festival in Albany, WA. Over 4 days, hundreds of kids joined in to print parts of the kombi. The end result was a humungous wall of colourful prints that was backlit and exhibited at Albany Town Hall.

Proposed name of piece:
Ink Drip Coffee

Vision:
What happens when ink and trash collide? Ink Drip Coffee takes objects that are usually seen as trash – such as crates, palettes, sticks and cans – and uses them as tools in printmaking. As an added twist, we will be printing onto used coffee cups to create a whole wall of vibrant, beautiful mini sculptures. Ink Drip Coffee involves taking trash from the Market, inking it up (using rollers and non-toxic ink) and pressing it onto rice paper, rubbing or wrapping to create a print. The rice paper will be wrapped and glued onto the used coffee cups using rice glue (rice starch and water). We will create approx 99 beautifully printed coffee cups to fill a 2x2m wall (displayed pristinely on shallow shelves, as in a white cube gallery).

I would love to invite people of all ages to collaborate in the process of inking cups at the market, so together we will create, literally, the bigger picture. What’s the bigger picture? A recent ABC report shows Australians consume 50,000 takeaway coffees every 30 minutes – and those 50,000 coffee cups go into landfill. Ink Drip Coffee is a lesson in how anything can become inspiration for art and creativity…even an old milk crate and coffee cup! It’s about bringing people of all ages and skills together with one common purpose: to make incredible artwork out of the unexpected and turn trash into treasure. It’s about reusing, repurposing and rethinking. It’s about colours, creativity and vibrancy.

Materials:
Non-toxic water-based inks, rice paper (recyclable), rice glue (DIY made from starch of waste rice sourced at Market, where possible, non acidic and biodegradable), ink rollers, shelving made from repurposed palettes, used coffee cups (cleaned).


Artist:
Sarah Mackay
Currently working as an artist using found objects and refuse from the local tip.

Proposed name of piece:
Think of me

Vision:
A large fish or turtle made from plastic to highlight the scourge of plastic in our oceans.

Materials:
An assortment of plastic bottles, bags, caps, cups lids etc. Any plastic based substances that are available.


Artist:
Carolyn Cardinet
Mixed media site-specific artist

Proposed name of piece:
PlasticTrap

Vision:
PlasticTrap is a single all white large sculptural hanging installation work. Passionate about the alarming rate at which our environment is changing, Carolyn Cardinet creates new forms out of plastic waste. Cardinet’s sculptural pieces reflect and draw attention to the worldwide problem of mass production and senseless waste of plastic and primarily single-use plastic packaging.

Materials:
The sculpture is assembled with all white single-use plastic packaging, bottles and take away containers (lids & trays included).


Artist:
Kim Simon
2003 – 2011: Founder, Designer, Maker of ‘fibre red’, a contemporary 100% wool women’s knitwear label hand made on domestic knitting machines in Melb; 2006-present: Designed and made art installations and sculptures for theatre, individual and group exhibitions. Also qualified as an Occupational Therapist.

Proposed name of piece:
Inseparable (based on the image of Yin and Yang)

Vision:
3D sculpture, expanding upon the structural design and creation of The World Is Your Oyster (pictured). At this stage the thought is to have a similar piece, but using the dark and light sides of the oyster shells in a Yin and Yang design. The principle of Yin and Yang is that all things exist as inseparable and contradictory opposites; trash and treasure; and dark and light, for example.

Materials:
Shells from Aptus Seafood, steel armature and wire.


Artist:
Tristan Tait
Designer & artist.

Proposed name of piece:
You are what you eat

Vision:
Recent statistics highlight the ever increasing amount of plastic that enters the ocean every day, a lot of this plastic is also single use. This sculpture aims to subtly reflect on the build-up of plastics in our marine life and the everyday use of non-biodegradable materials.

Materials:
Coffee cup lids, metal support frame.


Artist:
Jhess Knight
I am a professional puppeteer and puppet maker, I have been working in the industry for the past 5 years. I studied theatre here in Melbourne, receiving my Bachelor of Creative Arts from Deakin University in 2010 and then trained at the London School of Puppetry, receiving my masters level diploma in 2014. I work freelance as a puppeteer and maker for clients all over the country and also run my own small business Trash Puppets. We run puppet making workshops with a sustainability focus, teaching people to make puppets from Trash, as well as creating our own beautiful puppets and shows using 100% recycled and reused materials. Puppets are basically intricate sculptures that have movement, so I sincerely do consider myself a sculptor, and trash is my most common medium.

Proposed name of piece:
Big dog, small dog.

Vision:
A stag hound, in a playful stance, head down, bum up, ready to pounce. Fairly realistic in body shape and to scale, but very clearly made of trash. I intend to give the piece a motorised tail (either solar powered or wind powered), so that as people walk past this sculpture, they see a life in it, and engage. When I think of South Melbourne, I think of dogs, in all shapes and sizes. An incredibly dog friendly community, it was a huge part of why I moved to this area three years ago and have not left! The Market is no exception, always seeing gorgeous dogs hanging around the outside taking in all the sight and smells.

Materials:
An assortment of everyday trash used at the Market. Heavy use of plastic bottles and plastic bags as a way to associate the kind of rubbish that is often found washed up on the beach where our communities dogs like to play.


Artist:
Suellen Wilkie
B.A. Fine art (Sculpture) Honours with distiction RMIT.
Suellen’s painting and sculpture strive to create a poetic discourse which might encourage the viewer to give compassionate contemplation to the fragility of both human beings and the natural world: To recognize the fractured person in a fractured environment. The dichotomies of growing up in rural Victoria, living for many years on the Mornington Peninsula, and currently residing in Metropolitan Melbourne, have all contributed to her engagement with issues surrounding nature/culture. The theoretical discussion that is generated by the human manipulation of nature and each other has become a key element of her work. Even in absence, the body is evident in her work, which is usually conceptualized through a process of emotional and visual internalization. Drawing on her background in design and experience of industrial materials, Suellen aims through her work to address the universal language of healing by causing a direct transformation of materials, imbuing them with new life.

Proposed name of piece:
Avium

Vision:
The sculpture proposed will use transformed plastic bags collected after purchases from South Melbourne Market traders. The proposed work will be a large suspended bird.

Materials:
Waste transformed plastic bags collected from the Market.

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